MARINE Ai

Marine Ai is creating cognitive artificial intelligence to enhance maritime capabilities by drawing on decades of experience in manned and unmanned marine vehicle design, manufacture and operations, coupled with vast experience in automation and autonomous systems software architecture, and computer vision expertise.

Our Cognitive AI, Captain Watson, will improve safety at sea by assisting human operators, on ships and operating remotely, and will also be capable of fully independent, high-level autonomous operation. Our Cognitive AI, Captain Watson, will improve safety at sea by assisting human operators, on ships and operating remotely, and will also be capable of fully independent, high-level autonomous operation. Our Cognitive AI, Captain Watson, will improve safety at sea by assisting human operators, on ships and operating remotely, and will also be capable

MARINE Ai

Cognitive Artificial Intelligence for our Marine World

Marine Ai is creating cognitive artificial intelligence to enhance maritime capabilities by drawing on decades of experience in manned and unmanned marine vehicle design, manufacture and operations, coupled with vast experience in automation and autonomous systems software architecture, and computer vision expertise.

Our Cognitive AI, Captain Watson, will improve safety at sea by assisting human operators, on ships and operating remotely, and will also be capable of fully independent, high-level autonomous operation.

    One of the bigger causes for concern moving forward is the high number of marine casualties that are attributed, at least in part, to a degree of human error, recorded as 75%-96% in a recent analysis*. AGCS UK Marine Claims Manager, Kevin Whelan says that while the indicators are that, overall, shipping safety has improved, when incidents do occur it is primarily down to human error. “In fact,” he adds, “going back over the years, the human error component is on the increase. So, while safety has improved overall, when there is a casualty the human error element is more likely to be the cause.” 

    And of that percentage, a commonly identified cause of accidents involving human error is fatigue. This is a problem that has dogged the shipping industry with no signs of immediate improvement in light of the competitive forces driving down ship crewing levels, and pressure on turnaround time for ships in port. While steps have been taken in recent years to address fatigue on board, these are relatively easy to circumvent and have not been wholly successful in their introduction. An analysis of accident investigation reports over a ten year period from 2002 to 2011 from the UK, Australia, US, and New Zealand, found that of 427 available reports fatigue was listed as the main cause of an accident in 3.7% cases and was further listed as a contributory cause in 5.2% of cases. This suggests that it remains a significant current risk to the safety of ships**. Further analysis has revealed that inadequate risk management is frequently identified in accident investigation reports as the main cause of an accident. Of the 427 accident reports analyzed, the Seafarers International Research Centre found that in 29.3% of cases inadequate risk management was the main cause of an accident and in 9.8% of cases this was identified as a contributory factor.

     * Rothblum, A. M. 2006. Human error and marine safety. Volume 4 in U.S. Coast Guard Risk-Based Decision-Making Guidelines. U.S. Coast Guard Research and Development Center, (2006 online)

    ** Seafarers International Research Centre: analysis of accident investigation reports over a ten year period from 2002 to 2011 from the UK, Australia, US, and New Zealand

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